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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
at jpl. we take the same design that we used on the last mission and built them for msl. they are working very nicely. we checked out the cameras with that image and we are very happy. all the exposure times are as expected. after that image we acquired a 360 degree panorama. this graphic shows the thumbnail images from that panorama. we downlink those and put together this mosaic. these are being generated at jpl by the multi image processing lab. we will be down linking the full resolution versions of these images over the next day or two. the next graphic shows what we call a koehler projection. we took a panorama of the deck to document the state of the deck after landing. it is low resolution but you can see the rover of their -- there. q. can see the shadow of the rsm pointing to the right. -- you can see the shadow. we will get the full resolution version of those images down and we are looking forward to that. the next slide shows the first two full range images we have downloaded. this is a great shot pointed to the north. you can see in the near field these dour marks that the d
-- mentioned that it has been declared a by california governor jerry brown, who will be visiting jpl later on. i want to start with our panel and introduce them. first we have michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars exploration program in washington. we have the msl project manager for the jet propulsion laboratory. we have the physical investor of the -- investigator of the chem cam instrument from the los alamos laboratory in new mexico. next is the lead rubber plant at -- leader rover planner at jpl. also the principal investigator from chem cam in new mexico. last, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we will start with a special announcement from michael. >> before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars -- this was in november of 1971. in the video, you will see a couple of people you might recognize -- bruce murray and carl sagan and ray bradbury. if we can look at that video -- >> i was hoping, during the last few days, as we get closer to mars and the dust cleare
. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> ok, back in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after entry. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was damage or not. so the goal was to do it long
, integrated chief from jpl. doug ellison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> good morning. another fantastic day on mars -- curiosity continues to be paved basically flawlessly. we executed all the planned activities successfully yesterday. it is a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly. completing all planned activities as well. it is really just a great day all around. the activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to do -- upgrade our software on the rover. just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or a laptop or something -- we will do the same thing. we will have a new flight software that is optimized for service. we landed with one optimized for landing. that does not have to operate the arm and all that. the surface is not have to land the vehicle. we want to switch to this new software that is optimized for service operations. we will do that starting tomorrow. -- the day after tomorrow, sorry. we'll start that activity. we will do preparation for that activit
malin. don sumner from the university of california in davis. andy mischkin from jpl. doug ellison at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins predicts good morning. but another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave basically it flawlessly three had executed all of the planned activity successfully and nominally yesterday. it is a good time to point out the team operating curiosity also is performing basically flawlessly and completing of planned activities as well. it really is a great day all around. a couple of things for these activities, we are about to do or upgrade our software on the rover, just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or laptop, we're going to do the same thing. the software though it is optimized for service. landing does not have to drive the rover and operate the arm. the service does not have to land the vehicle. we will switch to the new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting the day after tomorrow. sol 5. prep work for that activity. we will check out the backup flight comput
, the team chief from jpl, and doug allison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave flawlessly and executed all the planned activities successfully after a period is a good time to point out that the teen operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly and completing all planned activities is well-preparedsol 3 activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to upgrade our software on the rover. we needed new flight software load that is optimized for the service garrett kern we want to switch to a new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting, the day after tomorrow. we have to do a little prep work for that activity. refit of some files to get ready to for the software transition garrett kern the other thing was to check out some more of our instruments. we checked out the instruments and that all past successfully and are all in great shape as far as we know. that is a great sign. no anomaly showed up in any of the tests. we took a lot
watkins, the mission manager. miguel from jpl the chief engineer. sarah from jpl she is the high- rise investigation scientist. and john of caltech the project scientist of the mission. >> good morning everyone. welcome to mars, welcome back to march if he were here last night. the surface mission of curiosity has begun. for a long time, those of us on the project knew we had to go through some big events. but we built this rover not just to land on mars but to actually try weimar's and execute a beautiful science mission. we have ended one phase of the mission and to be a joy a lot of folks on our team. another part has just begun. it is really the fundamental reason we built a rover. we are just starting admission. we are not ending it. two hours after landing. just before 1:00 a.m., curiosity called us from mars odyssey. mars odyssey was overhead. it comes around two hours later. mars has rotated. it was still over the horizon. we were able to have a short talk with curiosity. she told us she is in service nominal mode. she quickly transitioned to surface and nominal mode. not in sa
is yet to come. we will start with the question and answer part. we will start here at jpl. wait for the microphone runner to get to you. we will go in the first row first. state your name and affiliation. >> irish television. could we get times on the major events for the hga deploy and mast. >> i will provide this to you after this. >> if you could talk about the geology. there seems to be three distinct ideological regions. is that the thermal inertia is known as? >> i've been so busy but this mahli -- with this mahli step. you can see the heat shield is on the surface with lots of small creatures. curiosity is on a surface that has a rounded hills and your small creatures. north of curiosity is this leiter toned terrain with lots of basins and pets. if it was up to me i would go to where those three come together. as a starting point. [laughter] you can start to get a flavor of what is going on here. do you want to say anything? >> i just made that up. >> we're going to take another question. it was in the same row but two people to the left. >> hello. i come from france. you
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
us do it to request this wee. >> hubert humphrey. on c-span3. >> now nasa engineers at the jpl in california give an update on the mars rover curiosity mission. they talk about the space craft landing on mars earlier this week and show pictures. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> welcome to the jp el. we are holding our finalists conference for the week. -- our final conference this we. >> this week, we have had a tremendous success in landing on mars and the beginning of the exploration of a new world. we're going to hear from a senior software engineer who will give us a preview of what's coming up in the next few days for the rover. first, we're going to hear from the descent and landing team. they have been poring over the data and have some new details for us. first, i want to introduce the lead, adam, and his deputy, miguel san martin. >> thank you, veronica. we have a talented panel here for you today. miguel and i wanted to be the ones to introduce them to you. leading off the rotation, the operations lead for descent and landing. from the johnson space flight cen
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)